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Goldendale , Washington
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February 21, 1935     The Goldendale Sentinel
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February 21, 1935
 

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MALLTOWNPAPERS, INC. ALL CONTENT COPYRIGHTED. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. AGREEMENT. REPRODUCTION, DISSEMINATION, STORAGE, DISTRIBUTION PROHIBITED. E blished 1.879 Goldendale. Washington. Thur ay,-February 21, [935- IIL-US succuMBs+` Bicklet0n Farmers Will ! +-: + .+- + .' . ,, ,0 +,,E+ ....-....... fll"t Did It With My Litde Hatchet, Uncle [D 11010 / lI-Uay Meeung uJ i ................... FROM PNEUMONIA An all-day meeting of farmers in the Bickleton section is scheduled tel HELD MONDAy:be held at Bickleton, Monday Feb. r i26th, beginning at 10:00 o'clock ln l ;the Grange Hall, according to an! ][,AID TO REST B]~IDE: announcement made by L. W. Terna-! .._._ ;ham county agent yesterday morn-! a~E OF WIFE AN'D SON; ~ing. [ bLa~N'Y A~'rEND SERVICE CON ". A similar meeting is scheduled -" xor t~oluendale, Tuesday February l[HJC'Tll~ By M_$~f~ONS. i27, b~ginning at 10:00 o'clock in the courthouse. Farmers from Gold- endale. Centerville and High Prairie I will attend. Punerel services were held at t~e The purpose of the meetings, ac- Chapel Monday afternoon cording to Mr. Ternahan, is the dis-; RObert John Willis, who passed lcussion of wheat problems and crop at ~is home in this city last i and soil problems of interest to the l afternoon following an ill-: farmers of the sections ~vhere the l of but a few days with pneu-!meetings are held. Ooldendale Lodge No. 31, F. The meetings will be conducted A. M., conducted the service, with~With the aid of extension service EL Knox acting as Worehipfullspecialists of Pullman, among whom He read the obituary and!Will be Archie M. Camp, state wheat the ceremony. Mrs. Joel agent and Leonard Hegnaeur, crop sang "Crossing fine Bar," ! end soil specialist. Kindly Light." Following l last rites of his fraternal broth- tha remains were taken to the cemetery to be laid to rest the side of his wife Elizabeth, and sou James. This was in accord- with kis wish. Robert J~n Willis was born in Francisco, November 6th, 1862, ':a son of John and Margaret W/llis. was In that ctty he received his and grew to young man- In 1385 he wu married to Lewis, and tothis union three were born, Howard, who in infancy, Hazel, later wife of Dr. G. H. BUck, and w'no also is de- County agent Ternahan urges all farmers, and in particular wheat farmers, to attend the meetings in their particular section. Hogs Arrive at Mar- ket in Poor Condition The Portland Union Stock Yards Company has been receiving com- plaints concerning bruises on the hams of hogs sent there, according to L. W. Ternahan, county agent. He was informed of the situation in eem,ed, and Lillian, who makes her a recent letter sent him by George home in Portland. A. Pierson, president of the stock WitCh his family he moved to yards. Treadwell, Alaska, in 1885, to take l over the managership of the general Although part of this occurs at ::~i~Gold ,e~a.lmmry, of the Tread-t the stockyards, Mr. Pierson states that they are doing everything pos- ~t~e ~-~"~ mmmg Company, at thatisible to correct any improper prac- . r-he l~rrest operating gold mtnelticce there. He feels, however, that ~e~h~! world. His wife died at Tread- something can be done by the farm- m 1893, leaving him with the lers to prevent bruises when handling two small children, l hogs and loading them into cars for In 1903 he was united in martin e Wlth ~lt~tbeth McKanna. and g: ~nm an|on t~ere were three cl~dre'n born, RObert, of Yakima, Katherine 3frown'sttle, and James, who w~ ed in the Columbia river July 6th, 1930. Mr. and Mrs. Willis and' family came to Goldendale in 1907. to be- e partner in the Ledbetter & Co. He took charge of the grocm.y department and the imple- iUent ~usinesa of the ooncern for a ....L nUnued on ]BIEht) transportation, and he urges that a campaign ,be conducted to educate farmers and shippers not to use prod poles and similar appliances, and to refrain from kicking animals when loading or unloading. Close atten- tion to such a procedure would mean more money to the growers, and it is hoped that all farmers ~vlll co- operate. Mr. and Mrs. Coke Jenkins and Mrs. Jenkins' father, Gus Schultz were Goldendale business visitors Tuesday of this week. SEES NO GOOD IN BONNEVILLE DAM AND INDIANS SEEM TO JOIN IN VIEWPOINT T'~ following article Is composed from a "fan mail" letter to the writer by Mrs. Alma l~owe, 1625 Center St., Salem, at~r publication of the story the Yakima Ind~ns and the Villa dam in t1~e Sentinel and relgonian. " j aeration of Memalooee Island ] ~aloose Island, or as the In- WOuld say, memaloose lllihee'~ td for the dead), is situatedI O-olunzbia river on the line be- ]~aseo county and Hood River ~metly in Waste, and was burying ground before the whites came until the 1894, which washed away Of course this was a eacred Indians as they bury very at best and bury all their heads and trinkets with whites began going there in the gronnd for these even took skulls. The In-I not like this any more than I WOuld, so they set a watch I ~aloose Illthee. Many moP-f bodies to other burial q~nls Island was selected aet _ of mfety from wild animals i ~ntld Only be reached by I)oat. Paleface buried on the is- my i ~an early day Columbia river tla~m~,t e.aptain. He had lived the Indians for e number of 1~ Slid liked their ways and ideals. l~tve hi marked by a white shaft be seen from each side of the ~Oia river and from the high- ++_. ~ a point on Meyer's Peak ~ ~e~ the main road. When the boats used to run to The Dallas with tourists this island was pointed out to them as a place of interest." SPRING CONFERENCE OF LEGION HERE District 4-H Club Lead- ers to Meet March 16 The 4-H district five leaders con- ference will be held in Goldendale Saturday, March 16th. Local leaders from Klickitat, Kittitas, Yakima and Benton counties will participate in the one-day session, which will be presided over by Mrs. N. D. Richard- son, of Yakima county, and vice president of this district. Alice Roberts, district secretary of Yekl- ms, will else be present, as well as Donald L. Sanders, district exten- sion agent at Yekima, end Henry M. Walker, state club agent, Pullman, Wash. The program as announced by L. W. Ternahan, county agent, is as followe: ON APRIL 27TH MANY VISITORS EXPECTED leaders) (e) Prepared outlines; (b) Demonstration on holding an election. 11 : 00---Team demonstrations, one each from Benton, Kittitas, Yaki- ma and Klickitat counties. Noon l:15--Insplrational talk, "Coopera- tion Received from Local Lead- ers," Donald L. Saunders, district extension agent, Yekima. 1:35--Question Box, (Each leader limited to five questions) MrB. N. D. Richardson, chairman. 2:15--This Year's Local Club Pro- DISTINGUISHED VISITORS, DRUM AND BUGLE CORPS, BANQUET AND GRAND BALL ARE AMONG THE HIGH LIGH'I~. The American Legion 6th district conference is scheduled to be held in Goldendale April 27th, according to an announcement made by O. K. Hill, publicity chairman for the event. Legionairres ere expected to attend from points as far north as Cle Elum, ! from Yakima valley, and from Hood River and The Dallas. Arrangements for the entertainment of the district s[ members and vimtors are in the hand j of committee members, who were up-I pointed by Commender E. C. Kaiser, at tbe executive board meeting held las- Wednesday evening. According to tentative plans, the day will l~e re-+ plate wit~ enterbalnment. A parade, banquet and dance will be the main features, and everything possible will; be done by the local post to extend the best of hospitality to the visitors. Committee memberB in charge of arrangements for the conference are as follows, t~e first-mentioned being Subterwanean Dangers the chairman: Entertainment, E. C. 'There are four moving mountains KelBer, Bert Knox, Z. O. Brooks, in the vicinity where foundations for Howard Lewis, Dr. F. H. Collins and! the Bonneville dam will ~e placed. John Wunder; Banquet, Archie Aver- T'nis causes a continual shifting of ill, AI De La Grange, Lynn Spalding, i the main river channel as the Colum- Mark Smith Lynn Kelly and Glen] bia flows through the bed of the Nickerson; Dance, R. J. Mesec'~er, gorge. The railroad has hired .trackt Ralph Walker and Archle Blnns;I walkers for years to keep the rails t Parade, Harold Wolverton, Orville clear of ~lebris os.used by the move-I Mann, L G Oleon and John Bowdish manta of those ancient glaciers. The and Publicity, Ted Byars, Joel Ab- tracks themselves ~ave been moved, i shier, W. K. Reader and Dr. Wm. H. Shell mountain, Wind River mount-t West. should not be attempted before a days in each month. Heretofore the thorough survey shows that the ex-I meetings were held on Saturdays pense is Justified.,, and it is believed the change will be gram, Henry M. Walker, state club agent. 3: 00---Adieu rnment. 4-H Livestock Meeting The Junior Livestock Breeder's Association will meet at the Grange Hall on Saturday evening, February 23rd, at 8 P. M. The work on "Fesda & Feeding in the Berkshire gilt con- test, will continue. There will be lh'estock Judging in several breeds of dairy cows. Bobby Bratton will give a talk on "Care of Baby Chicks." Games and refreshments will follow the meeting. Parents and friends are invited to be present. Busfa~ Better County Clerk Gee. M. Baker and deputy R. M. Spoon had a rushing . . lJadia~ q[~,eatlesi moP co-venlent for a ~reater nu-~ marriage license business this last t eetaed at Hood River for 55+ ~'~r of +he --~-~-e'~hi~ Th .... , Saturday, issuing three that after- yearsDu n tb g at time I saw much r~, lar "~*i .... ,11 ~,~ hera ,~,~ao,,~ noon and one in the evening. Other oft e Indians and was alway8 friend-ev 1 --e-ru ~'t~ -t t . oI than two issued the first of this h en ng, JP" D art zO I S ate i ly w;th tem I read your ~r c ~ v e ," ti le in ia - "n r .... month, there ha e b en none since last Sunda- s Or ..... p nneu ~ ar ange zor a soczax event ........... e~man ana could I -- n " - o~-" "~ " I the t|rst of tne year. Tnose lssueu a end ()f n me ear xuture, pr oemy the Iore see b sympathy between u~ a " of ....... Saturday were as follows: Richard on the rights of the Indians. I will p rt ..~arcn. 17enmte announce- Crabtree' Maupln and Margaret O. sent wut ne ma~e Later also tell you how I feel about th~~ " Fruit, McMlnnville; Lives Horn and Bonneville dam. The Hood River pa- pers are on the aide of the dam be- ing built and would not print any- thing against it. I can see many things why it should not be. It is another way to spend a lot of mon- ey and I doubt if it Is ever finished, but the states will have to pay for it." (Continued on Last Page) Mrs. Ida Hauru, Hood River;" Leo ik~w ~ Home Jones, Goldendale and Mildred A deal ~ts now in progress whereby Short, Cliffs and Robert Elllott and the Z. O. Brooks house on East. May Morehouse, Klondike, Ore. Broadway will be sold to W.E.] ---"- Elation, manager of the local J. C. [ Mrs. I, H. Barlow, of Lyle, was in | Penney store. The Slettens are at1 Goldendale Friday, visiting with her present occupying the H. W. Bates[ neice, Mrs. Harry McCredy and fam- ~oase on E~t Court ~treet. I ily.. 1 REP. FRED D. KEMP TELLS OF PROPOSED GAME LEGISLATION WORK STARTS NEXT WEEK BOUNTIF~ ARE TO BE RESUMED AND ~AG~ SOIA) TO HUNTERS; APPP~PI~IAq~IONSARE ML~J)]~ ~OR DEPARTMENT, In a letter to The Sentinel this week, state representative Fred D. Kemp ~ays the real important bills of the session will be in the coming week. A great deal of legislation ~as been thus far proposed, but when the wheels get te moving the axe will vigorously ply amid the over 500 bills already introduced. In regard to the present game sit- uation and proposed legislation In the House there is about $150,000 in the game fund. The G~me Depart- ment hue askBd for $1,180,812 for the next ~Jiennium while the Gov- ernor ~as recommended $963,530. The estimated funds from licenses, fees and other minor sources is ex- pected to be $912,935. Regardless of how much is appropriated by the legislature, only the money In the game fund can be expended. Sportsmen are anxious to have all mousy received from game sources remain in the Game Fund and spent on propagation of game and game fish. However, according to the State Constitution, it is necessary that the legislature make the appropriation from the game fund to t13e State Game Commission for the actual spending of this money. This is in accord with the desires of tbe State Game Commission and the State Game Director, Ray James~ who want this money to go through the regular channels of the State Treasurer and audits made by t~e State Auditor. The only legislation which has been proposed in the House relating to game activities has been a com- mittee [)ill setting up u bounty fund of $50,000 to be appropriated from the Game Fund for the purpose of bounties, to be allotted as follows: $25 on cougars, $5 on bobcat and lynx, and $1 on coyotes. Tags will be cold to the big game hunters at 50c each to make up this fund. The Game Department will issue permits in certain areas to any one who de- sires to apprehend these animals for bounties. This Is done to stop the possible fraud which was so preva- lent under the old bounty system and which caused its downfall. In addition, there iB a prey]alan for ~seven salaried coyote hunters to be employed by the Game Commission. 56. No. 8 Legion Members ar-e--[MEE:I'+IN-G$+SCH+ -ULED Banqueted byAuxiliaryJ FOR FARMERS TO The Americ= =lion suxiliaryJ SIGN UP 1935 PLAN entertained the American Legion members at a pot luck dinner Mon- day evening this week. About sixty Legionalrres and their wives and auxiliary members and their hus- bands were present, Following the dinner several of those present wer~ called upon to participate in an lm~ promptu program. Mrs. F. H. Collln~ rendered a vocal solo, the Legion quartet, Z. O. Brooks, Dr. Wm. H. West, E. C. Kaiser and Harold Wol-i verton, sang a number and O. K., Htll complied to requests with ~! vocal solo. Several other members,: SAME BOUNDARIES USED OFFICER8 k~OR COUNTY COBLM~T- T~E AKE EhECTED; G~-OPER- AT10N URGED TO R-EDUGE AD- MINISTRATION (X~T. Hog producers of Kllckitat county were notified this week by County arranged beforehand were presented iAgent Ternahan of community ~meet- as follows: Alene Spalding and Ver-t with~lngsl to be held for the purpose of ona Montanye, a vocal duet, Wands]Signing up for the 1935 corn-hog harmonica accompaniment; Mal .plan and to elect three 1935 com- Vanhoy, two readings and Mt~s sanity committeemen, one of which ita Walden, vocal solo. The remain- will serve as chairman of the corn- der of the evening following the program was spent Playing bridge and games. The committee in charge of the event were: Mrs. O. K. Hill, chairman, Mrs. Z. O. Brooks, Mrs. Lynn Spalding, Mrs. Eugene Vaahoy and Mrs. Archie Banns. School Election March 2. The general school election will be held Saturday, March 2nd, ac- cording to Mrs. Sara Perry, county superintendent, who stated that the election supplies were sent out to all the districts the letter part of lest week. Those residents of the city, who wis~ to vote, must be registered on the permanent registration books. No registration is required for those outside the city limits or In what are claselfled as third class districts. The present school board members are Z. O. Brooks. C. H. Lawson and Ernest D. Roe. Mr. Brooks is the re- tiring member. Brought Out from Valley. Added to the list of pneumonia pa- tients is Nell Watson, who was brought to Goldendale from the Ce- dar Valley were he was taken ill two weeks ago. It was necessary to rig up a toboggan to bring him out Sunday as the snow is too deep to allow a car to get through. He is being cared for at the home of Mrs. Eva Radcllff. Those men who brought him in were Otis Miller, Walter Riddle, Chester McIlroy, Elmer Collins. Douglas Layman and Alfred Jacroux. Mrs. Lena Watson came down from the East End the first of the week to be with her son, and the latest report indicates that he is improving, being able to take nourisl~ment for the first time Tues- day. munlty committee and member of the Board of Directors. Producers are eligible to vote only when appli- cations for the 1935 hog contract are signed. Community boundaries will ~be the same for 1935 as in 1934, and the 1934 con~munity committee will be iu charge of each meeting. Mr. Ternahan has requested that the producers desiring to sign a 1935 corn-hog contract should be present at the commu~tity meeting nearest them in order that administrative expense for this year can be min- imized. The following is the schedule for those communities outside of Gold- endale and Centervills, which meet- ings were held Tuesday of this week: High Prairie: Friday, February 22, at 2:00 P. M., Johnson School I-IOUR~. White Salmon: Monday, February 25, at 1:30 P. M., Legion Hall. Glenwood: Tuesday, February 26, at 9:30 A. M., Basement of High School. Trout Lake: ~ruesday, February 26, at 1:30 P. M. Pearson Store. Twenty-five hog Producer~, Who signed applications for their 1935 corn-hog reduction contracts, were present at the meeting held in Gold- endale Tuesday, electing the follow- ing committee: H.G. McPherson, chairman; Walter D. Norris, vice- chai~nan and Harry Fergu~on, ~all three of whom served last year. At the Centervllle meeting at the K. of P. Hall Tuesday there were 23 producers who had signed applica- tions for the 1935 contracts. They also elected the same committee that served during 1934: Henry Stegman, chairman, D. I-~ugh Cameron, vice- chairman and George Garner TO QUALIFY FOR 1935 FARM-HOG ADJUSTED PAYMENTS .FARMERS REQUIRED TO COMPLY Only bona fide farm operators will qualify for the 1935 corn-hog ad- Justment payments, according to L. W. Ternahan, county agent. Those persons who will not be engaged in corn and hog production In 1935 within reasonable limits of their an- nual average production for 1992-33. end whose participation in the pro- gram would not accomplish the pur- poses of the AAA, will not be eli- gible for the benefits of the 1935 program. Any producer, who did not in 1934 own, when farrowed or pro- duced for market, at least 25 per- cent of his hog base, will not he re- garded as a bona fide farm operator, unless he can present evidence antis- factory to the county allotment com- mittee that such failure was not the re~mlt ~f retiring or having retired from the production of hogs The same will apply in the case of the farmer who sign~ a contract and does not in 1935 produce for market at least 25 percent of his hog base. The wheat compliance program for 1935 should ~e completed with unusual dispatch, according to Archie M. Camp, state commodities repre- sentative. All wheat land under con- tract was measured last ye~kr, leav- Ing only the astral compliance check- up, the forms of which are fewer in number and greatly simplified, mak- ing possible a speedy chsok-up with less delays in benefit paymentL Miss Edna Nye, who has been[ No wheat of any kind can be Ned- week, led on the 1935 contr~w_~ted acres, quite ill with the flu the past week.[ which constitute 10 percent of the is reported as convalescent this 1 base acreage. Grass or legume crops may be seeded for erosion proven- tlon, weed control and soil improve- ment and with the exception of wheat, forage crepe may be seeded for hay, pasture or roughage only. These include alfalfa, clover, field peas, barley, rye and oats. They may be pastured or cut green for hay but cannot be used for seed production or allowed to reach maturity. Farmers who follow the summer- fallow practice and have ploughed or cultivated the land held out of production as contracted acres in 1934, will find It to their eAvantage to seed crops to prevent erosion, control weeds and improve the soft. Winter wheat may ~)e seeded and pastured if desired. H~wever, if wheat on this land is allowed to mature for grain in excess of the 1935 base establtehed by the county allotment committee, compliance cannot be granted. A careful check-up will be made to see that average-acres have been selected ~ contracted acres for 19~. The producUon record of these should be equal to the average yield of all wheat land on the farm. Un& Woes Ar'ehle Banns underwent an oper- ation for hornha at the Veteran's hospital in Portland yesterday morn- ing and as yet no report ia available concerning his condition. He ham been there the past ten days for examination and X-ray purposee. -